All Dressed Up

Hashem told Moshe to instruct the wise hearted people, who have been invested with a spirit of wisdom, to make holy clothing for Aharon and his sons. These glorious and splendorous pieces of clothing would be worn to sanctify the kohanim and they were to be used to minister before Hashem. There were eight pieces of clothing altogether. They were: 1) a breastplate 2) an apron 3) a robe 4) a cloak 5) a turban 6) a belt 7) a gold plate and 8) underpants (Parshas Tetzaveh, 28: 2-42).

The Mishna (Yoma, chap. 7, "Ba Lo Kohen Gadol", pg. 71b) says that a Kohen Hedyot (regular or ordinary kohen) would only wear four pieces of clothing. They were: 1) cloak 2) underpants 3) turban and 4) belt. The Kohen Gadol (High Priest) wore those four pieces of clothing also, but, in addition to them, he wore: 5) breastplate 6) apron 7) robe and 8) gold plate.

The garments of a Kohen Hedyot were called Bigdei Lavan (white clothing) because they were made from white linen. The additional garments of a Kohen Gadol were called Bigdi Zahav (golden clothing) because they had gold on them.

The purpose of these Bigdei Kehuna were to atone for various sins. Rebbi Inyani bar Sason (Zevachim, chap. 9, "Hamizbeach Mikadesh", pg. 88b) says that there is a juxtaposition between korbanos (offerings) and the Bigdei Kehuna (Parshas Tzav, 6:2 - 8:2) to teach us that just as the offerings atoned for sins, so did the Bigdei Kehuna atone for sins. There were specific sins that these pieces of clothing atoned for.

The cloak atoned for murder, the underpants atoned for immorality, the turban atoned for arrogance, the belt atoned for evil thoughts, the breastplate atoned for judicial sins, the apron atoned for idolatry, the robe atoned for lashon hara, and the gold plate atoned for brazenness.
The Shvilei Pinchas says that since today we no longer have these articles of clothing, we can only benefit from them by learning about them. This is based on the Gemara (Menachos, chap. 13, "Hrei Alai Isaron", pg. 110a; Rebbi Yitzchak) which says that anybody who studies the Torah about a sin offering will be credited as if he brought the sin offering (Parshas Tzav, 6:18, "Zos TORAS Hachatas"). Similarly, just by learning about the Bigdei Kehuna, we will be credited as if we wore the Bigdei Kehuna and benefit from their powers of atonement.

Therefore, let us engage in the study of these Bigdei Kehuna and benefit from them. There is a huge chiddush (novel idea) about these holy garments. We are going to share this idea right now.

The Midrash Ne'elam (in Zohar Chadash, cited by the Shvilei Pinchas) says, "When the Jewish people are liable for their sins, Hashem will fulfil for them the verse which says, 'Ubipisheichem Shulcha Imchem' (it is because of your rebellious sins that your mother was sent away; Yeshaya, 50:1), Vaeshtaer Emchatz (and striking down will be left over), this refers to the striking down of the heads of your enemies. And when the Jewish people return in repentance, I (Hashem) will return Imchem (your mother) to her place. At that time the eight articles of clothing worn by a Kohen Gadol on Yom Kippur will be complete."

Rebbi Nasan Nata Shapiro (Poland, 1585-1633, author of Migaleh Amukos) says that the understanding of this Midrash will remain a closed book until the coming of Moshiach. However, the Maharash M'astropoli (Likkutei Shoshanim) says that there could be one understanding of this Midrash, but we would first have to look at a certain Gemara to help shed some light on the matter.

The Gemara (Sanhedrin, chap. 4, "Echad Dinei Mamonos", pg. 39a) reports that once upon a time a certain heretic asked Rabbi Avahu a question. The heretic claimed that Hashem is a Kohen because in Parshas Terumah (25:2) Hashem said, "Viyikchu Li Teruma" (and they must take for Me a tithe). Teruma is usually given to a kohen. Since Hashem asks for teruma to be given to Him, it must be that He is a Kohen. After establishing that Hashem is a Kohen, the heretic asked the following question. After Hashem buried Moshe Rabbenu (Parshas V'zos Habracha, 34:6), what did Hashem immerse Himself in to purify Himself from the impurity which exudes off a dead body? Rabbi Avahu responded by saying that Hashem immersed Himself in a river of fire, as it says, "Hashem will come in a fire" (Yashaya, 66:15).

Tosafos (ibid, Divrei Hamaschil "B'mai") asks why the heretic did not ask an even better question. The heretic could have asked that since Hashem is a Kohen, how could He have defiled Himself to begin with? A Kohen is not allowed to come into contact with dead bodies.

Tosafos answers this question by saying that this did not bother the heretic because the heretic knew that the Jewish people are considered to be God's children (Parshas Re'eh, 14:1). As such, although in general a kohen may not defile himself by coming into contact with dead bodies, an exception is made for the seven close relatives of a kohen which are: father mother, brother sister, son daughter, spouse. If one of the seven close relatives die, a kohen may defile himself for them. Therefore, since Moshe was a Jew, he was considered to be one of God's children. Therefore, Hashem could defile Himself to bury Moshe. The Heretic knew this. Therefore, he only asked how Hashem purified Himself afterwards.

The Maharash attacks this answer by saying that Tosafos's defense of the heretic does not suffice. This is because only a Kohen Hedyot may become impure for one of his seven close relatives who dies (Parshas Emor, 21:2-3). However, a Kohen Gadol may not become impure even for one of his seven close relatives who dies (Parshas Emor, 21:21). Therefore, if Hashem is indeed a Kohen, He must be a Kohen Gadol. After all, Hashem is called "Gadol" as it says, "Hagadol Hagibor Vihanorah" (the Great the Powerful, and the Awesome One; Parshas Eikev, 10:17). If so, Tosafos's original question comes back. The heretic should have asked an even better question. Since Hashem is a Kohen Gadol, how did He contaminate Himself to begin with? Why was the heretic only bothered by how Hashem purified Himself afterwards?

The Maharash answers this attack by sharing a secret found throughout the Zohar. Since Hashem loves the Jewish people so much, He demotes Himself to the level of a mere Kohen Hedyot in order to enable Himself to descend to the impure places of the Jewish people. This is not just for the purposes of burying somebody who needs to be buried, but this is also in order to atone for the Jewish people.

When Jews sin, it creates impurity. The Jewish people become contaminated by their own sins. Hashem cannot bear to watch his children wallowing in spiritual filth. Hashem wants to descend in order to cleanse the Jewish people from their sins. But, if Hashem would maintain the status of a Kohen Gadol, He would not be allowed to descend and "get His hands dirty", so to speak, even on behalf of His children. Therefore, Hashem demotes Himself to the level of a mere Kohen Hedyot so that He is able to descend into our impurities and cleanse us. This is something that a Kohen Hedyot may do on behalf of his children.

The heretic knew this secret. Therefore, the heretic was not bothered by how Hashem could bury Moshe, because he knew that Hashem demotes Himself to the level of a Kohen Hedyot in order to be able to assist His children who are caught in their spiritual pollutions. The heretic only wanted to know how Hashem purified Himself afterwards.

The Maharash says that this whole dialogue between the heretic and Rabbi Avahu, with the give and take of Tosafos, will help us understand the Midrash Ne'elam in the Zohar Chadash.
So far, we have seen that Hashem demotes Himself to the level of a Kohen Hedyot to cleanse the Jewish people. This means that when the Jewish people sin and need to be purified, Hashem dons only four Bigdei Kehuna acting like a Kohen Hedyot. Before we proceed, we must first remind ourselves what the names of the eight Bigdei Kehuna are, and we must become familiar with which pieces of clothing were worn by a Kohen Gadol and which were worn by a Kohen Hedyot.

The Shmoneh Begadim are:

1) Avnet (belt)
2) Mitznefes (turban)
3) Ksones (cloak)
4) Michnasayim (underpants)
5) Eiphod (apron)
6) Mi-eel (robe)
7) Choshen (breastplate)
8) Tzitz (gold plate)

A Kohen Hedyot wears only four of these articles of clothing. They are:

1) Avnet
2) Mitznefes
3) Ksones
4) Michnasayim

A Kohen Gadol also wears these four articles of clothing, but, in addition to them, he wears another four. They are:

1) Eiphod
2) Mi-eel
3) Choshen
4) Tzitz

Now we can proceed to explain the meaning behind the Midrash Ne'elam from the Zohar Chadash. It said that when the Jewish people are liable for their sins, Hashem applies the verse in Yeshaya to them. That verse said, "Ubipisheichem," (because of your rebellious sins), "Shulcha Imchem." The translation of those words was, "Your mother will be sent away." However, a deeper read of these words is as follows.

The word "Imchem" does not mean "your mother" in this context. Rather, the word "Imchem" is an acronym of the four Bigdei Lavan that a Kohen Hedyot wears. The word "Imchem" is spelled with four Hebrew letters which are: aleph, mem, chuf, and mem. Those four letters serve as the acronym for the four Bigdei Lavan.

1) The aleph stands for eiphod
2) The mem stands for mitznefes
3) The chuf stands for ksones
4) The mem stands for michnasayim

Therefore, the words "Shulcha Imchem" means that when the Jewish people are contaminated by their sins, Hashem sends (Shulcha) the four Bigdei Lavan (represented by the acronym of Imchem) away. This leaves Hashem with the remaining four pieces of golden clothing worn only by a Kohen Gadol. This is what the Midrash meant when it went on to say, "Vaeshtaer Emchatz." Earlier we said that the translation of those words was "And striking down was left." However, a deeper read of those words is as follows. The word "Emchatz" does not mean striking down, rather, the word "Emchatz" is an acronym for the four golden pieces of clothing of a Kohen Gadol.

The word "Emchatz" is spelled with four Hebrew letters. They are aleph, mem, ches, and tzadi. These four letters serve as the acronym for the four Bigdei Zahav.

1) The aleph stands for eiphod
2) The mem stands for mi-eel
3) The ches stands for choshen
4) The tzadi stands for tzitz

Therefore, the words, "Vaeshtaer Emchatz" means that Hashem will be left wearing the four Bigdei Zahav. With those Bigdei Zahav, Hashem descends to the Jewish people to cleanse them from their impurities.

Then the Zohar Chadash went on to say that when the Jewish people do teshuva, Hashem will return "Imchem" to her place. This no longer means that Hashem will return "your mother" to her place, rather, it means that Hashem will return the four Bigdei Lavan represented by the acronym "Imchem" (avnet, mitznefes, ksones, michnasayim). Meaning, Hashem will wear the other four Bigdei Kehuna as well, resulting in Hashem wearing all eight Bigdei Kehuna. Once Hashem succeeded at cleansing the Jewish people, He goes back to his lofty status as Kohen Gadol.

This approach of the Maharash begs us to ask the following question. On the one hand we see that Hashem wants to be a Kohen Hedyot because He dons only four Bigdei Kehuna like a Kohen Hedyot (This is understandable because Hashem wants to be able to defile Himself to help cleanse His children). On the other hand, we see that Hashem wants to be a Kohen Gadol because the four garments that He chose to wear were the gold clothing that a Kohen Gadol wears.

Therefore, there seems to be a contradiction here. If Hashem wants to be a Kohen Hedyot, He should wear the four Bigdei Lavan like all other Kohen Hedyots do. If Hashem wants to be a Kohen Gadol, then He should wear all eight begadim like a Kohen Gadol does. What kind of mixture is this of four pieces of clothing like a Kohen Hedyot, yet, gold clothing like a Kohen Gadol?

Before addressing this question, let us share another statement in the Zohar. In the preface to Tikkunei Zohar (Pg. 3b), there is a Zoharic given. It says that the four Bigdei Lavan of a Kohen Hedyot correspond to the four letters of Hashem's Name Havaya (spelled: Yud - Hey - Vov - Hey). However, the four Bigdei Zahav of a Kohen Gadol correspond to the letters of Hashem's Name Adni (spelled: aleph, dalet, nun, yud).

The difficulty with this statement is that the Name Havaya is a higher-ranking Name than the Name Adni. We can see this from the fact that we are not allowed to pronounce the Name Havaya in the way that it is spelled. This is a special level of respect that is given to the Name Havaya which does not apply to the Name Adni. We may pronounce the Name Adni in the way that it is spelled.

Therefore, why would the Zohar say that the four Bigdei Lavan of the lower-ranking Kohen Hedyot correspond to the higher-ranking Name Havaya, and why would the Bigdei Zahav of the higher-ranking Kohen Gadol correspond to the lower-ranking Name of Adni? It should be the other way around.

The Maggid of Khoznitz (Rabbi Yisrael Hopstien, 1737-1814, Poland), in his sefer Ohr Yisrael on Tikkunei Zohar, explains that there are two levels of rachamim (Divine compassion) that descends to our world. The first type is when we benefit from Divine compassion which descends to us, but, it does not have the power to transform din (harsh and strict justice) into rachamim. The second type of rachamim which descends to us is so strong that it even has the power to transform din into rachamim.

The Name Havaya draws the first type of rachamim into the world. Havaya brings Divine compassion down, but, it does not have the power to transform harshness into softness. However, the Name Adni draws the second type of compassion to the world. Adni brings such strong compassion down that it even has the power to turn sharpness into smoothness.

We can see this from the Name Adni itself. The Aramaic word for harsh and strict justice is "dina" which is spelled with four Hebrew letters, dalet, yud, nun, and aleph. The Name Adni is also spelled with four letters. They are aleph, dalet, nun, and yud. These are the same exact letters. It's just that the Name Adni transforms dina into a Name of Divine compassion. This demonstrates that Adni brings down such powerful Divine compassion that it can transform bitterness into sweetness (Raya Mihemna, Parshas Mishpatim, pg. 118a).

From this perspective, the Name Adni is higher than the name Havaya. It is no longer surprising that the four Bigdei Lavan of the lower-ranking Kohen Hedyot correspond to the lower-ranking Name Havaya, and it is no longer shocking that the four Bigdei Zahav of the higher-ranking Kohen Gadol correspond to the higher-ranking Name Adni.

The Maggid of Kohznitz goes on to say that this will help us understand the Maharash who said that Hashem dresses in four begadim like a Kohen Hedyot, and yet, He chooses to wear the four Bigdei Zahav like a Kohen Gadol which seems to be contradictory. You see, when the Jewish people are sinning, the world is full of dinim and impurity. Hashem wants to descend to purify us. To do so, Hashem must demote Himself to the level of a Kohen Hedyot which will then allow Him to become spiritually impure on behalf of His children. On the other hand, Hashem requires specifically the gold garment of a Kohen Gadol for this job because only they correspond to the Name Adni which has the power of transforming dinim into rachamim. In other words, Hashem wants the best of both worlds. That explains why He dons only four pieces of clothing like a Kohen Hedyot, but He chooses specifically the four pieces of gold clothing in order to transform the harshness into compassion.

Parenthetically, we find that the gold clothing is indeed connected to din just by color association. The color gold is related to the color red. This is found in the Mishna and Gemara (Yoma, chap. 4, "Taraf Bakilpi", pgs. 43b-44b) which says that on Yom Kippur, the Kohen Gadol would scoop up the incense with a shovel of "red gold." We see from here that gold is related to red.

Red is connected to the color black because the Gemara (Chullin, chap. 3, "Eilu Traifos", pg. 47b; Rebbi Chanina) says that a black uterine discharge is really a red discharge except that it degenerated and turned black. We see from here that red is connected to black.

Now, the color black is the opposite of the color white. In the Torah, the color white always represents purity and compassion. Since black is the opposite of white, it must be that black represents strict justice. (By the way, this does not mean that black is bad. We need both compassion and justice in the world to create balance. The right side of Hashem is rachamim whereas the left side of Hashem is din. As such, the left side represents the Divine approach of din. Just as left is not bad, rather it just represents a Divine approach, similarly, black is not bad. It just represents a Divine approach).

So, if black represents din, and if red is connected to black, and if gold is connected to red, it must be that gold is connected to din. This is perfect because gold can get into din and then transform it into rachamim on account of its (golds) association to the Name Adni which has the power of converting din to rachamim.

Being that Parshas Titzaveh is read around Purim time, we also find that Purim shares this quality of transformation. If there are two words which best describe the essence of Purim, it would have to be, "Vinahafoch Hu" (and it was transformed; Megillas Esther, 9:1).

When you think about it, all the events which occurred during the Purim story were of the nature of transformation. Not only did the evil plots of Haman not come to fruition, but they backfired and had the opposite effect. Instead of the Jews being murdered by the Jew-haters, the Jew-haters were defeated by the Jews. Achashveirosh was transformed from foe to friend. What would have been the saddest day on the calendar became the happiest day of celebration.

However, at the beginning of the story, the situation looked bleak. The Jewish people had sinned by bowing down to Haman's idol and by participating in Achashveiorosh's filthy party. Din filled the world. The Jews were drowning in spiritual contamination. How did the tables of such a miserable situation turn in such a drastic way?

Hashem came to the rescue. To assist the Jewish people, Hashem demoted Himself into a Kohen Hedyot. In this way, He would be allowed to descend into the Jewish people's state of impurity and begin the process of spiritual healing and cleansing.

However, to transform the din into rachamim, Hashem chose to wear the four Bigdei Zahav because they are connected to the Name Adni which has the power of converting bitter into sweet and harshness into compassion. It worked. Hashem, by wearing His four Bigdei Zahav, had the desired effect. The Jews were saved, both spiritually and physically.

Therefore, at the end of the story, Hashem could go back to His rightful position of Kohen Gadol. At the end of the Purim story, Hashem donned all eight pieces of Bigdei Kehuna like a Kohen Gadol. There is even a hint in a verse which points at Hashem wearing all Shmoneh Begadim.

The pasuk towards the end of Megillas Esther (8:15) says, "And Mordechai went out from before the king dressed in royal clothing." The verse goes on to describe Mordechai's clothing. "Blue (clothing), white (clothing), a large golden crown, and a purple linen robe." That was the English translation of the verse. Now, please pay attention as to how many Hebrew words the verse uses to describe Mordechai's clothing.

Here we go:

1) Techeles (blue)
2) Vachur (and white)
3) Va'ateres (and a crown)
4) Zahav (golden - a golden crown)
5) Gedolah (large - a large golden crown)
6) Vitachrich (and a robe)
7) Butz (linen - a linen robe)
8) Va'argaman (purple - a purple linen robe).

There are specifically eight words that are used to describe Mordechai's clothing. Why? Because, what happens on this lower world mirrors what is happening in the upper world. This verse is hinting to us that at that time, Hashem also donned eight pieces of clothing, the eight pieces of clothing that a Kohen Gadol would wear.

After all, the verse says that, "Mordechai Yatza Milifnei Hamelech" (and Mordechai went out from before the king). According to the Zohar, every mention of "Hamelech" (the King) in Megillas Esther, is also a reference to the King of Kings, Hakadosh Baruch Hu. Therefore, when it says that Mordechai went out from before "the King," it meant that Mordechai, a representative of Hashem, stood before Hashem with clothing that were described with eight expressions to hint at the eight articles of clothing that Hashem Himself was wearing at that time. Once the Jewish people were rescued, Hashem went back to the status fitting Hashem which is the status of Kohen Gadol.

By wearing all Shmoneh Begadim, Hashem was hinting to the Jewish people that it was time to return home to the Land of Eretz Yisrael, build the Beis Hamikdash and do the avodah with the Bigdei Kehuna. Some Jews did return to the Land. However, we sinned again, and the Temple was destroyed. Once again, the Jewish people were surrounded by spiritual contamination and dinim. Once again, Hashem would have to demote Himself to the level of a Kohen Hedyot to allow Himself to come into contact with that impurity for the purpose of cleansing His children from spiritual filth. Since Hashem wanted to transform the din into rachamim, He chose the golden clothing of a Kohen Gadol because they have the power of transformation because of their connection to the Name Adni.

Therefore, Rebbi Yochanan, who lived after the destruction of the second Beis Hamikdash, would offer a personal prayer after he concluded his Shmoneh Esrei. His prayer went like this: "May it be Your will Hashem our God that You gaze upon our shame and behold our evil plight, Visislabesh (and clothe Yourself) with mercy, Visiskaseh (and cover Yourself) with strength, Visisatef (and wrap Yourself) with kindness, Visisazer (and gird Yourself) with graciousness, and bring Your attribute of goodness and humility" (Gemara, Brachos, chap. 2, "Haya Koreh", pg. 16b).

In this tefillah, Rebbi Yochanan mentioned four expressions asking Hashem to clothe Himself. The four expressions are: 1) Visislabesh 2) Visiskaseh, 3) Visisatef and 4) Visisazer. Rabbi Yechiel Heller (Shu"t Amudei Ohr, #122) says that these four expressions correspond to the four Bigdei Lavan that Hashem is currently not wearing. Since Hashem is presently only wearing the four Bigdei Zahav to transform the dinim into rachamim, Rebbi Yochanan was asking Hashem to finish the job of tikkun already so that Hashem will be able to go back to the status which is befitting Him, which is the level of a Kohen Gadol, donned in all eight Bigdei Kehuna. Because once the tikkun is done, and Hashem is clothed in all Shmoneh Begadim, that will indicate that the Final Geulah is at hand.

The four expressions of Rebbi Yochanan are not random. Each expression directly correlates one of the four Bigdei Lavan of a Kohen Hedyot that Hashem abandoned. For example, the first expression Rebbi Yochanan used was "Visislabesh" (clothe). This word refers to the ksones (cloak) because the root of "Visislabesh," is "Lovesh." Every time the ksones is mentioned, a word, whose root is "Lovesh," is used. For example, it says, "Vihilbashtam Kutanos" (and dress them in cloaks; Parshas Titzaveh, 29:8). The root of "Vihilbashtem" is "Lovesh." It also says, "Vihilbashta Osam Kutanos" (and dress them in cloaks; Parshas Pekudei, 40:14). Again, the root of "Vihilbashta" is "Lovesh." It says, "Vayalbishtem Kutanos" (and dress them in cloaks; Parshas Tzav, 8:13). Once again, the root of "Vihilbashtem" is "Lovesh." Finally, it says, "Kesones Bad Kodesh Yilbash" (a sacred linen cloak he must don; Parshas Shmini, 16:4). The root of the word "Yilbash" is "Lovesh."

The second expression Rebbi Yochanan used was "Visiskaseh" (cover). This word refers to the michnasayim (underpants) as it says, "Va'aseh Lahem Michnisei Bad Lichasos Besar Erva" (and you must make for them linen underpants to cover the flesh of nakedness; Parshas Titzaveh, 28:42). The word "Lichasos" and the word "Visiskaseh" share the same root.

The third expression of Rebbi Yochanan was "Visisatef" (wrap). This word refers to the mitznefes (turban) because the Gemara (Moed Katan, chap. 3, "V'eilu Migalchin", pg. 24a) says that any "Atifa" (wrapping) that is not like the "Atifa" of the Yishmaelim, is not an "Atifa." The Ramban says that the mitznefes would be "Atuf" (wrapped) around the head. Therefore, the word "Visisatef" refers to the mitznefes.

The fourth expression of Rebbi Yochanan was "Visisazer" (gird). This word refers to the avnet (belt) because the purpose of a belt or a sash is to gird oneself.

Rebbi Yochanan specifically worded himself with these four expressions because he was begging Hashem to bring back the four Bigdei Lavan. This was a way of asking Hashem to finish cleansing us so that Hashem can go back to the status fitting Him which is the level of a Kohen Gadol.

Practically speaking, even if we are not kohanim, we are a "Mamleches Kohanim" (a kingdom of priests; Parshas Yisro, 19:6). This means that what kohanim are to the rest of the Jewish people is what that Jewish people are to the rest of the world. As such, let us try, a little bit more, to be like those kohanim. For example, the kohanim wore begadim that were splendorous and glorious (Parshas Titzaveh, 28:2).

Therefore, when we get dressed in the morning, let us dress properly. Obviously, this means to dress modestly within the letter of the law and within the spirit of the law. However, there is another point that I would like to make here, and that is that we should dress aristocratically, with class. After all, we are "B'nei Melech" (children of the King). Each one of us is a prince or princess. We should dress the part.

This means that we should dress in a way that makes a Kiddush Hashem and not a Chilul Hashem. This would include dressing in clean clothing. We should look put together. We should not go around looking shloompy. We should give off a regal impression because we are B'nei Melech - Mamleches Kohanim.

When we do this, then, our clothing take on the status of Bigdei Kehuna. The advantage of this is as follows. Imagine how a person would feel if he were to wear the Choshen Mishpat and the Tzitz. He would feel uncomfortable to engage in negative behavior because it would be below his dignity. Similarly, when we look like B'nei Melech, we would begin to feel that certain activities are simply beneath our dignity.

So, when we recite the bracha, "Malbish Arumim" (the One Who clothes the naked), let us take out a moment to look at our noble clothing. This will remind us of who we are, B'nei Melech. This simple act can help direct us by keeping our daily adventures to activities that are befitting a Ben Melech and a Bas Melech. During the day we could look down at our clothing for this reminder to help maintain our regal status.

By the way, the box of tefillin worn on the arm has four parshiyos in it. Those four parshiyos correspond to the four Bigdei Lavan. The box of tefillin worn on the head also has four parshiyos in it which correspond to the four Bigdei Zahav. Together, a pair of tefillin, with their eight parshiyos, correspond to the Shmoneh Begadim (Tikkunei Zohar, Tikkun 38, pg. 78b). Although most of us do not wear tefillin all day long, we can still keep its message with us throughout the day.

Additionally, it would not be a bad idea to recite the tefillah of Rebbi Yochanan occasionally. Let us beg Hashem to don full Kohanic garb and bring the geula in the merit of our attempt to dress and to behave like a Kohen Gadol.

So, may we all be blessed to dress properly and carry ourselves with aristocracy, remembering who we are, and that it is beneath our dignity to stoop to the low levels of sin, and thus deserve to witness the third Temple standing tall, with Hashem returning to us in full Kohanic garb, destroying the Yetzer Hara forever, which will transform this planet from a world of din into a world of rachamim.